Our Team

  • Vicki Been

    Vicki Been

    Vicki Been is the Edward Weinfeld Professor of Law at NYU School of Law, an Affiliated Professor of Public Policy of the NYU's Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, and Faculty Director at NYU Furman Center. She returned to NYU in January 2022, after serving for two years as Deputy Mayor for Housing and Economic Development for the City of New York. She has done extensive research on New York City’s land use patterns, inclusionary zoning, historic preservation, the interplay of community benefit agreements with land use practices, and on a variety of affordable housing and land use policies, including gentrification, mortgage foreclosure, racial and economic integration, and the effects of supportive housing developments on their neighbors. She is the co-author of a leading land use casebook, Land Use Controls. Vicki is a 1983 graduate of New York University School of Law, where she was a Root-Tilden Scholar. She clerked for Judge Edward Weinfeld of the Southern District of New York and for Justice Harry Blackmun of the Supreme Court of the United States.

  • Ingrid Gould Ellen

    Ingrid Gould Ellen

    Ingrid Gould Ellen is the Paulette Goddard Professor of Urban Policy and Planning at NYU’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and Faculty Director of the NYU Furman Center. Her research centers on neighborhoods, housing, and residential segregation. Ingrid is the co-editor of The Dream Revisited: Contemporary Debates About Housing, Segregation, and Opportunity (Columbia University Press, 2018). She is also the author of Sharing America’s Neighborhoods: The Prospects for Stable Racial Integration (Harvard University Press, 2000) and editor of How to House the Homeless (Russell Sage Foundation, 2010). She attended Harvard University, where she received a Bachelor’s degree in Applied Mathematics, an M.P.P., and a Ph.D. in Public Policy.

  • Katherine O’Regan

    Katherine O’Regan

    Katherine O'Regan is Professor of Public Policy and Planning and Faculty Director of NYU’s Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy. She spent April, 2014 through January, 2017 in the Obama Administration, serving as the Assistant Secretary for Policy Development and Research at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Her primary research interests are at the intersection of poverty and space—the conditions and fortunes of poor neighborhoods and those who live in them. Her recent research includes work on a wide variety of affordable housing topics, from whether the Low Income Tax Credit contributes to increased economic and racial segregation, to whether the presence of housing voucher households contributes to neighborhood crime. Her board work includes serving on the board of the Reinvestment Fund, one of the largest community development financial institutions in the U.S. She holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California at Berkeley and spent ten years teaching at the Yale School of Management prior to joining the Wagner faculty in 2000. 

  • Hector Blanco

    Hector Blanco

    Hector Blanco is a postdoctoral research scholar at the NYU Furman Center. He is an empirical microeconomist with research interests in public and urban economics. His current work studies how affordable housing programs shape neighborhoods and affect local housing markets, with a particular focus on the impacts of public housing and inclusionary housing programs. Hector received his Ph.D. from MIT in 2022. Before MIT, he obtained his M.Sc. in Economics from the Barcelona School of Economics and his B.A in Economics from Universitat Pompeu Fabra.

  • Ryan Brenner

    Ryan Brenner

    Ryan Brenner is the Research Analyst at the NYU Furman Center. Prior to joining the Furman Center, Ryan worked as a service provider in San Francisco’s homeless shelters and supportive housing developments. He received a B.S. in Conservation Biology from Colorado State University, J.D. from Michigan State University, and M.S. in Public Policy from NYU Wagner. Ryan is interested in using data to improve urban infrastructure and policy for sustainable development.  

  • Jiaqi Dong

    Jiaqi Dong is the Data Manager at the NYU Furman Center. Prior to that, she worked as a Research Associate at the JPMorgan Chase Institute. She holds a Master of Urban Planning from NYU Wagner and a Master of Science in Applied Urban Science and Informatics from NYU Tandon, and was part of the Furman data team during her graduate school studies. She got bachelor's degree from NYU Shanghai, with double major in Business and Finance and Interactive Media Arts. Her research interests are neighborhood change, using data and technology to build more equitable communities and food.

  • Martha Galvez

    Martha Galvez

    Martha Galvez is the Executive Director of the Housing Solutions Lab. Her expertise is in housing and homelessness policy, with a focus on policies and programs that strengthen housing stability and neighborhood choice for low-income families. She has experience in mixed-methods research, and has designed and led studies involving complex administrative, survey, and qualitative data. Prior to joining the Lab, she was a Principal Research Associate at the Urban Institute. She has also held policy and research positions in several state and local research organizations, including the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services' Research and Data Analysis division, the West Coast Poverty Center at the University of Washington, the Seattle Housing Authority, the New York City Department of Small Business Services, and the New York City Citizens Housing and Planning Council. Galvez earned an undergraduate degree from Wesleyan University and a master’s degree in Urban Planning and PhD in public policy and administration from the Robert F. Wagner School of Public Service at New York University.

  • Sophie House

    Sophie House

    Sophie House is the Director of Law and Policy at the Housing Solutions Lab. Before joining the Lab, Sophie was a Legal Fellow at the NYU Furman Center. She also served as a law clerk to the Honorable Andrew D. Hurwitz of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. She is a graduate of Yale Law School, where she worked with local government attorneys through the San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project and represented low-income clients in housing proceedings at the Urban Justice Center and New Haven Legal Assistance. She holds a B.A. in Economics from New York University and an MPhil in Comparative Social Policy from the University of Oxford. Sophie’s research focuses on how cities approach challenges related to housing instability, homelessness, and the use of public space.

  • Noah Kazis

    Noah Kazis

    Noah Kazis is a Legal Fellow at the NYU Furman Center. Previously, he worked at the New York City Law Department, where he represented the City in matters including the development of legislation limiting greenhouse gas emissions from buildings, the defense and implementation of the City's sanctuary city policies, and two rounds of charter revision. He also served as a law clerk for the Honorable Douglas P. Woodlock of the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts and the Honorable Joseph A. Greenaway, Jr. of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. Noah is a graduate of Yale Law School, where he was a student director of the Community and Economic Development Clinic, working to build affordable housing in New Haven and to support anti-exclusionary zoning policies in Connecticut and New Jersey. His research focuses on land use and local government law, with a particular emphasis on the institutional structures of local governments. 

  • Donald H. Layton

    Donald H. Layton

    Donald H. Layton is a Senior Visiting Fellow from Practice. Prior to joining the NYU Furman Center, he served as a Senior Industry Fellow at Harvard’s Joint Center for Housing Studies, where he wrote extensively about the Government Sponsored Enterprises (GSE) of Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae and more broadly on housing finance. Before his stint in academia, Layton was the CEO of Freddie Mac from May 2012 until June 2019, where he championed the development of Credit Risk Transfers, one of the most significant reforms to the housing finance system in decades.

  • Ellie Lochhead

    Ellie Lochhead

    Ellie Lochhead is a Predoctoral Research Fellow at the NYU Furman Center and Housing Solutions Lab. She received an M.S. in Economics and Urban Planning from Tufts University and a B.A. in Economics and Public Policy from the University of Denver. Her research interests include urban economics and housing policy with a particular focus on issues of housing stability, rent burden, eviction, and homelessness.

  • Charles McNally

    Charles McNally

    Charles McNally is the Director of External Affairs at the NYU Furman Center. Previously, he served as a Public Affairs Officer and Special Assistant in the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s New York Regional Office. In addition to managing communications and press for HUD’s $6 Billion portfolio of grantees and housing agencies across New York State, he served as a liaison to stakeholders during rulemaking processes on Difficult Development Areas and Small Area Fair Market Rents. Before joining HUD, Charles practiced Community Development in Togo and Madagascar as a Peace Corps Volunteer. He has a Master’s in Public Administration from Rutgers University-Camden. 

  • Kayla Merriweather

    Kayla Merriweather

    Kayla Merriweather is the Program and Operations Coordinator at the NYU Furman Center. She received her B.A. from New York University with an Individualized Major in History and Place through a Black Feminist Lens, and a Minor in Spanish. 

  • Matthew Murphy

    Matthew Murphy

    Matthew Murphy is the Executive Director of the NYU Furman Center. Previously, he served as Deputy Commissioner for the Office of Policy and Strategy at the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD). As an urban planner working at the intersection of housing policy, affordable housing finance, and land use, Matthew has been quoted on New York City and national housing issues in the New York Times, CNN, NBC, Going for Broke with Ray Suarez, NY1, Politico, Crain’s, Real Deal, City Limits, Gotham Gazette, among other media outlets. Matthew has a Masters of Urban Planning from New York University and a B.S. in Business Administration from DePaul University in Chicago. He lives in Brooklyn with his loving wife and son.

  • Bethany O’Neill

    Bethany O’Neill

    Bethany O’Neill is the Director of Operations and Finance at the NYU Furman Center. She earned her B.S. in Food Science & Human Nutrition from the University of Florida and her M.A. in Food Studies from New York University. Bethany is interested in food policy issues and their intersections with sustainability and urban planning.

  • Yuju Park

    Yuju Park

    Yuju Park is the Technical Assistance Manager at the Housing Solutions Lab. Before joining the Lab, Yuju worked in affordable housing advocacy in Silicon Valley and conducted research with UC Berkeley’s Terner Center for Housing Innovation and the Center for Community Innovation. Prior to that, she worked as a Research Analyst at the Urban Institute on projects focused on child welfare and community and economic development. Yuju received a B.A. in Sociology from Bryn Mawr College and a Master of City Planning from University of California, Berkeley. Her research interests include alternative homeownership models, social and public housing, and the intersections between housing and transportation policy. 

  • Hayley Raetz

    Hayley Raetz

    Hayley Raetz is the Director of Data and Policy at the NYU Furman Center. She previously worked as a research associate and graduate student researcher at the Terner Center for Housing Innovation at UC Berkeley. Prior to that, she worked as a project manager and case manager for a community-based organization in the Bronx, where her work focused on eviction prevention, homelessness, and healthcare. She received her Master’s degree from the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, and her B.A. in Government and Spanish from Smith College.

  • Jim Reisinger

    James is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Housing Solutions Lab. He is an applied microeconomist and holds a PhD from the Harvard Kennedy School and a BA from Georgetown University. His independent research explores the historical determinants of racial inequities. Previously he worked with Princeton University and the Busara Center for Behavioral Economics on poverty alleviation program evaluations in East Africa.

  • Betty Wang

    Betty Wang

    Xiao (Betty) Wang is a postdoctoral research scholar at the NYU Furman Center. She is an applied microeconomist with research interests in urban and real estate economics, and housing policy. She studies how housing market segmentation could lead to spillovers of supply-side regulations. She is to receive her Ph.D. in Applied Economics from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Before Wharton, she obtained B.A/B.S. in International Area Studies, Mathematics and Economics from Washington University in St Louis.

  • Camille Watson

    Camille Watson is the Director of Strategy and Policy at the Housing Solutions Lab. Previously, she held policy and research positions focused on improving the social, economic, and environmental conditions that impact population health. At the American Academy of Pediatrics, she led policy initiatives on social determinants of child health, including poverty, housing insecurity, and homelessness. Prior to that, she worked at Health Care For All (MA), promoting policy reforms and collaborations across government sectors, to reduce health disparities. Camille has also managed community-based research in public housing developments. She earned her Master’s degree from the Harvard University School of Public Health. 

  • Mark Willis

    Mark Willis

    Mark Willis is the Senior Policy Fellow at the NYU Furman Center, conducting research, writing, and speaking on such urban-related policy issues as affordable housing, housing finance reform, community development lending and investment, and the Community Reinvestment Act. Before joining the NYU Furman Center, Mark was a Visiting Scholar at the Ford Foundation, working on research related to community development and the financial services sector. Prior to his time at Ford, he spent 19 years at JPMorgan Chase overseeing its community development program, serving as Executive Vice President and Founding President of the Chase Community Development Corporation. Mark has also held positions with the City of New York in economic development, tax policy, and housing, where he was the Deputy Commissioner for Development at the Department of Housing Preservation and Development. He also worked as an urban economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Mark has taught Housing and Community Development Policy at New York University’s Law and Wagner Schools. He co-chairs the Economic Development and Housing Committee of the Citizens Budget Commission, chairs the Program Planning Committee of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, and serves as a Board Member of the National Housing Conference, National Community Investment Fund, and a number of other boards involved with housing and community development. Mark has a B.A. in economics from Yale University, a J.D. from Harvard Law School, and a Ph.D. in urban economics and industrial organization from Yale University.

  • Jessica Wunsch

    Jess Wunsch is the Peer Cities Manager at the Housing Solutions Lab. Prior to joining the Furman Center, she was a policy analyst at the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy where she supported the Legacy Cities Initiative, a national network of local leaders from post-industrial cities working to increase access to opportunity and improve quality of life for residents. She also served as a Hatfield Fellow at the Oregon Department of Housing and Community Services where she focused on improving foreclosure prevention programs and has held several local government roles in San Francisco, Philadelphia, and Greensboro, North Carolina. Her primary interests include innovative approaches to housing and land use policy and the role of community-based research in informing public decision making. She holds a B.A. in Environmental Studies from Ithaca College and MPP and MURP degrees from the University of Michigan.

  • Ken Zimmerman

    Ken Zimmerman

    Ken Zimmerman is a Distinguished Fellow at the NYU Furman Center. Ken’s research examines new forms of social advocacy and policy development in the urban environment, with a special focus on evolving mechanisms for civic engagement and innovative approaches to address growing inequality. Ken, a noted policy maker, fair housing expert, and civil rights attorney, has devoted his career to justice and equality issues. Prior to joining the NYU Furman Center, Ken served as the Director of U.S. Programs for the Open Society Foundations, where he oversaw the annual dissemination of over $100 million in grants to organizations focused on equality, fairness, and justice. Before joining Open Society Foundations, he served as part of the Obama Administration’s presidential transition team for the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and served as senior advisor to HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan. Previously, he was a litigation partner for the pro bono practice group at Lowenstein Sandler PC, chief counsel to New Jersey Governor Jon S. Corzine, and founding Executive Director of the New Jersey Institute of Social Justice. Early in his career, Ken served as a Senior Trial Attorney, then Deputy Assistant Secretary for Enforcement and Programs, in HUD’s Office of Fair Housing. He also served as a Skadden Legal Fellow at the Legal Aid Society of Alameda County, California, and at the Washington D.C. Legal Clinic for the Homeless. Ken graduated magna cum laude with a B.A. from Yale University in 1982 and earned a J.D. from Harvard Law School, also graduating magna cum laude, in 1988.