Sign Up Facebook Twitter LinkedIn
The Dream Revisited
Discussion 2: Economic Segregation in Schools

Discussion 2: Economic Segregation in Schools

March 2014

The second discussion on The Dream Revisited explores economic segregation in our schools and argues for its continued relevance today. 

Essay

  • Economic Segregation in Schools

    by Charles Clotfelter

    In contrast to racial segregation, it may be that economic segregation, such as that I have measured in schools, carries less of the misplaced normative baggage Mary Pattillo addressed in her post. That is, education experts and social observers would be hard-pressed to come up with good things to say about economic segregation. Across schools, economic segregation almost inevitably means unequal access to the best teachers and other resources.

Discussants

  • Why Economic School Segregation Matters

    by Richard D. Kahlenberg

    Why does socioeconomic school segregation matter?  Clotfelter notes that school poverty concentrations are deeply troubling, in part because “economic segregation almost inevitably means unequal access to the best teachers and other resources.”  Teachers in middle-class schools are far more likely to be experienced and to have greater skills as measured by teacher test scores.  They are most likely to be specifically trained to teach in their subject area, whereas teachers in high-poverty schools are more likely to teach “out of field.” 

  • Talking About Diversity

    by James Ryan

    In this brief post, I want to focus on how we tend to talk about racial and economic segregation at the K-12 level and how this differs markedly from how we talk about the same thing at the university and college level. At the K-12 level, most of the academic—and public—conversation about segregation speaks in terms of costs.

  • Race Remains the American Dilemma

    by Richard Rothstein

    In fact, our schools in Louisville, Seattle and elsewhere are racially imbalanced not because their neighborhoods are de facto imbalanced, but because those neighborhoods were segregated by government policy whose effects endure, structuring the residential opportunities of African Americans.

More Discussions

  • Discussion 21: Suburban Poverty & Segregation

    The twenty-first discussion explores the increasing diversity of suburbs and increasing levels of suburban poverty and debates the challenges of supporting poor households’ economic self-sufficiency beyond the central city.

    September 2016

  • Discussion 20: Making Vouchers More Mobile

    The twentieth discussion examines the benefits of defining fair market rent by zip code, to make it easier for families to move to higher-opportunity neighborhoods, and weighs potential unintended costs.

    July 2016

  • Discussion 19: Public Housing and Deconcentrating Poverty

    The nineteenth discussion debates what we should do about high-poverty, distressed public housing developments in light of recent research from the Moving to Opportunity Program about the costs of concentrated poverty.

    May 2016

  • Discussion 18: Segregation & the Financial Crisis

    The eighteenth discussion debates the extent to which segregation exacerbated the unequal effects of the mortgage-driven financial collapse of 2007 and ways to address racial disparities in mortgage lending.

    February 2016

  • Discussion 17: Community Preferences and Fair Housing

    The seventeenth discussion debates the extent to which preferences in neighborhood residents in accessing new affordable housing promote or betray the goal of truly inclusionary communities. 

    November 2015

  • Discussion 16: A New Approach to Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing

    The sixteenth discussion reacts to HUD’s renewed commitment to the new requirement of the Fair Housing Act to “affirmatively further fair housing.”

    November 2015

  • Discussion 15: Moving Up or Moving Out

    The fifteenth discussion explores the most effective ways to address concentrated poverty, focusing on policies that target both people and place.

    July 2015

  • Discussion 14: Housing Subsidies & Inclusive Communities

    The fourteenth discussion examines the policy issues underlying Texas vs. The Inclusive Communities Project: how government officials should balance the use of Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) allocations to create affordable homes in low-poverty neighborhoods with the use of LIHTC allocations to catalyze economic development in high-poverty neighborhoods.

    June 2015

  • Discussion 13: The Future of the Fair Housing Act

    The thirteenth discussion debates the significant of disparate impact liability under the Fair Housing Act, in light of the Supreme Court's deliberation in Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project.

    April 2015

  • Discussion 12: The Poor Door Debate

    The twelfth discussion weighs the controversy about "poor doors" in the context of a debate over the costs and benefits of mixed-income housing in high-cost markets.

    March 2015

  • Discussion 11: Explaining Ferguson Through Place and Race

    The eleventh discussion in The Dream Revisited explores how metropolitan development patterns shaped by race and class set the stage for the events in Ferguson, MO.

    January 2015

  • Discussion 10: Balancing Investments in People & Place

    The tenth discussion in the Dream Revisited debates the appropriate balance between investments to help low-income households move to neighborhoods that offer greater access to opportunity and investments to improve the quality of life in low-income neighborhoods.

    November 2014

  • Discussion 9: Residential Income Segregation

    The ninth discussion in The Dream Revisited analyzes segregation by income and debates the significance of the increasing isolation of the affluent.

    November 2014

  • Discussion 8: Neighborhoods, Opportunities, and the Housing Choice Voucher Program

    The eighth discussion in The Dream Revisited explores how the federal Housing Choice Voucher program can most effectively improve social, educational, and economic opportunities for voucher recipients. 

    October 2014

  • Discussion 7: Comparative Perspectives on Segregation

    The seventh discussion in The Dream Revisited explores what can be learned by looking at racial and economic segregation through a comparative lens. 

    September 2014

  • Discussion 6: Implicit Bias and Segregation

    The sixth discussion explores how implicit bias contributes to residential segregation and whether or not awareness of implicit biases can heighten a sense of moral urgency.

    August 2014

  • Discussion 5: Place-Based Affirmative Action

    The fifth discussion explores proposals to re-imagine affirmative action by focusing on neighborhood disadvantage instead of race.

    July 2014

  • Discussion 4: Neighborhood Gentrification

    The fourth discussion explores the relationship between gentrification, neighborhood integration, and public participation.

    May 2014

  • Discussion 3: Ending Segregation: Our Progress Today

    The third discussion in The Dream Revisited asks why we haven't made more progress in reducing segregation. 

    April 2014

  • Discussion 1: Why Integration?

    The frst discussion in The Dream Revisited asks what we mean by "integration" and why it may be a necessary strategy to acheive racial and economic equality.

    January 2014