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Rental housing landscape findings for each of the 11 largest US metro areas in the study – Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New York City, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Washington, DC. 

  • Atlanta

    The increase in the rental population outside of Atlanta city limits was 2.5 times as large as the entire renter population in the city of Atlanta in 2014.

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  • Boston

    Recent movers in the Boston metro area paid rents 27 percent higher, on average, than incumbent renters in the Boston metro area.

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  • Chicago

    The growth in renters in Chicago’s suburbs was driven by renters in single-family homes.

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  • Dallas

    The number of renters in the Dallas metro area increased more than 35 percent between 2006 and 2014.

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  • Houston

    In 2014, the Houston metro area had the lowest median gross rent among metro areas in our sample, and tied for the highest income growth between 2006 and 2011 among the 11 largest metro areas.

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  • Los Angeles

    Suburban Los Angeles had the highest share of renters (46%) among the suburbs of the 11 largest metro areas in this study.

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  • Miami

    The average number of residents in a rental household in the Miami metro area increased by only two percent between 2006 and 2014, the smallest increase among the 11 largest metro areas.

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  • New York City

    New York City metro area’s rental housing stock did not keep pace with its growth in renter population.

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  • Philadelphia

    Between 2006 and 2014, the share of the population who rented their homes increased both in Philadelphia proper and in the surrounding suburbs.

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  • San Francisco

    The growth in renter population grew faster in the San Francisco suburbs than in the city proper between 2006 and 2014.

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  • Washington, DC

    The renter population in the Washington, DC metro area grew by 35 percent—nearly half a million people—between 2006 and 2014.

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